Say hello to Google Sheep View

Say hello to Google Sheep View

Say hello to Google Sheep View

Durita Dahl Andreassen, of the tourist organization Visit Faroe Islands, has fastened a 360-degree camera, powered by a solar panel, to the back of her sheep. And some of the most picturesque views aren't accessible by road, but as sheep are free to roam the Faroe Islands as they please, they can carry cameras virtually anywhere.

She said: "The tiny capital of the Faroes, Tórshavn, is my home, and my colleagues and I want to share our handsome, green and undiscovered land with friends and acquaintances around the world via Google Street View".

The Faroe Islands are under Danish Administration, and are located between Iceland and Norway in the North Atlantic Ocean.

The sheep thus far have taken panoramic images of five locations, while they are also taking 360-degree video.

"Here in the Faroe Islands we have to do things our way", said Durita Dahl Andreassen, who works with islands' tourism board, in an interview with The Guardian.

The Visit Faroe Islands' Twitter account was quick to respond.

Computer says no Why has Google Street View blurred out two ordinary British houses? In the meanwhile anyone curious to visit the Faroe Islands can explore them in the most natural way - from the back of a sheep.

The idea has also spawned the hashtag #wewantgooglestreetview and Google Maps has clearly started to take notice after tweeting this on Tuesday.

"I think that we're ready for this", Ms Andreassen said.

"Google Street View has been all over Europe, even to the top of Mont Blanc, but never to the Faroe Islands". "It's a place that has always been so hidden and far away from everything, but I think that we are ready to invite people to the place".

The project (which is still in development, given that the initial camera fell off during its test run) is part of a major push to bring Google Street View, and hopefully more tourism, to the archipelago.

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