Local Election Issues: Liberal Christy Clark

B.C. Liberal Leader Christy Clark arrives for a Vaisakhi event at the Khalsa Diwan Society Sikh Temple in Vancouver B.C. on Saturday

Local Election Issues: Liberal Christy Clark

While operating expenses are predicted to produce small surpluses over the next three years, the New Democrats expect to add $7 billion to the province's debt over five years through capital expenditures aimed at creating 96,000 jobs.

He says he will bring back the seniors' ferry discount on weekdays, and provide new funding for classroom supplies and equipment in elementary and high schools, as well as 114,000 new rental and co-op homes around the province.

"We're going to eliminate them. This approach has the option of being nice to immigrants but also making sure we can draw people to Vancouver to live and work here, because it's not too expensive".

- With the federal government expected to announce plans Thursday to legalizing marijuana, Clark said she wants assurances organized crime is shut out of the pot business and that marijuana stays out of the hands of children.

A large part of cutting that waste, according to Horgan, is getting rid of what he calls Christy Clark's "LNG Fantasy Fund".

Cote said the cuts will harm the Mayors' Council's long-term transportation plan.

"My first thought was who is going to be paying for all this?" she said.

He noted with current homeowner grants, the higher value of the home, the less the grant takes effect.

Lower costs but better jobs and services - that was NDP leader John Horgan's motto as he kicked off his party's provincial election campaign in Surrey on Sunday. "To just take the $500-million dollars out of the prosperity fund that we've set aside from non-renwable resources, and they're going to spend that entire savings account for our kids in two years".

- Horgan says he's already having meetings about how to distribute legal marijuana, including talks with liquor outlets, craft brewers, pharmacies and dispensaries.

The BC Liberals released their election platform Monday, promising four more balanced budgets and repeating commitments made in the February budget, including a 50 per cent reduction in medical services premiums starting in 2018.

But Mike de Jong, the Liberal government's finance minister, said the NDP's proposals would cost at least $4 billion a year and lead to a credit downgrade.

The platform also includes plans for $10-a-day childcare and an annual $400 rebate for renters.

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