Elon Musk Unveils the Machine that Will Tunnel Under Los Angeles

Elon Musk Instagram

Elon Musk Instagram

Also during the TED talk, Musk said that the tunnels wouldn't be for cars to directly drive into, but that they would instead park on an electric sled that would transport cars at 125 miles per hour (200 km/h) on tracks installed in the tunnels.

Get ready to bypass congested city streets by putting your vehicle on Elon Musk's underground sled, which can travel at at 125mph. Now, the company is slowly expanding, and a "boring" machine has been spotted. Of course, the video Musk shared was entirely computer generated and seemed like something out of a science-fiction movie, but he's already making progress.

In the post, Musk said the sleds would automatically switch from tunnel to tunnel, making the commute from Westwood to LAX take five minutes. It will be 200 feet long when complete, he says.

The project began when Musk tweeted in December 2016 about being stuck in the notoriously bad Los Angeles traffic.

The SpaceX and Tesla founder posted the news on his Twitter and Instagram accounts, along with a series of photos about 8 a.m.

Musk said the Boring Company is focusing on ways to improve technology and efficiency enough to reduce cost by at least tenfold. Musk plans for the first full-length tunnel to run from LAX to Culver City, Santa Monica, Westwood and Sherman Oaks.

SpaceX senior engineer Steve Davis is leading the development of technology for The Boring Company's tunnels, and Musk previously revealed that the transportation system should eventually fit roughly 30 layers of tunnels and a hyperloop.

It's unclear whether Musk has received the necessary approval from the city government for this tunnel.

Recall that in late April, Musk demonstrated the concept of high-speed tunnel.

And in another video, Musk gave an idea of how some of The Boring Company machinery works - including a rotating cutterhead that will cut through underground rock.

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