How President Trump's Tweets Hurt His Travel Ban

How President Trump's Tweets Hurt His Travel Ban

How President Trump's Tweets Hurt His Travel Ban

What that means-to Trump, to the judges who have heard challenges to the order and to a revised version, and to the future of civil rights-is an issue that the Supreme Court is now being asked to decide.

Justice Department lawyers have been trying to differentiate between the comments Trump made during the campaign and then as president, as Trump signed two executive orders banning travel from Muslim-majority countries.

"These tweets may make some feel better, but they certainly won't help [the solicitor general] get 5 votes in [the Supreme Court], which is what actually matters".

In an NBC interview on Monday, she cited a media "obsession with covering everything he says on Twitter and very little of what he does as president".

In a string of subsequent tweets, Mr. Conway made clear he continues to "VERY, VERY STRONGLY support" Trump, his policies, the executive order, "and of course, my wonderful wife".

After President Trump's first executive order was blocked, the president signed a second one, imposing a ban on travel from Iran, Sudan, Syria, Libya, Somalia, and Yemen for 90 days.

George Conway later posted an analysis by the Washington Post that indicated that Trump's tweets on the travel ban could hurt the government's case in court.

The Virginia-based 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on May 25 upheld a nationwide halt to the travel ban, saying it was driven by unconstitutional religious motivations.

"It's not a Muslim ban. He has more important things to do than respond to Donald Trump's ill-informed tweet that deliberately takes out of context his remarks urging Londoners not to be alarmed when they saw more police - including armed officers - on the streets".

"As president, I will do what is necessary to prevent this threat from spreading to our shores and work every single day to protect the safety and security of our country, our communities and our people", he said.

Washington state Attorney General Bob Ferguson, who has battled President Donald Trump over the President's efforts to limit travel and immigration from some Muslim-majority countries, tweeted a "thanks" to Trump Monday. "We don't need the help but will take it!" "He isn't concerned with being politically correct". The Justice Dept. should ask for an expedited hearing of the watered down Travel Ban before the Supreme Court - & seek much tougher version! This raises, again, the question of what "the original Travel Ban" is in Trump's mind. This presents the executive order as an opening gambit, and a model for future, broader actions.

"Its kinda odd to have the defendant in HawaiivTrump acting as our co-counsel", tweeted Neal Katyal, lead counsel in the Hawaii lawsuit challenging the travel ban. But Trump on Monday was having none of it. In one instance, he leveled an inaccurate criticism of London Mayor Sadiq Khan, saying the mayor was telling people there was "no reason to be alarmed" about the attack. But the Supreme Court could ask for supplemental briefing as to whether these statements could be used, or the plaintiff's lawyers could file a motion to include them, which Yale-Loehr thinks would be likely.

"We need not probe anyone's heart of hearts to discover the goal of EO-2, for President Trump and his aides have explained it on numerous occasions and in no uncertain terms", Gregory wrote.

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