Trump Visits Florida to Assess Hurricane Irma Damage

Seniors fight post-hurricane heat with Popsicles, compresses

President Trump praises rapid response to Irma in Florida

The White House on Tuesday announced that President Donald Trump will travel to Florida on Thursday as the state begins its recovery from Hurricane Irma.

The White House has not announced where in Florida the president will go. "This has been a hard situation". They visited with first responders and helped hand out water and food to people who needed it.

Irma has devastated Florida, causing at least 25 deaths as of Wednesday morning, and leaving millions without power.

Mr Trump made two visits to Texas in the wake of Hurricane Harvey's record flooding.

The president, wearing a white baseball cap with "USA" written on it, later visited Naples, near where Irma first reached the United States mainland on Sunday, handed out sandwiches to resident at a feeding station under a blue shade pavilion. "I hope this man right here, Rick Scott, runs for the Senate", he said.

Trump's visit to tour hurricane damage on Thursday was his second trip in as many weeks. "We are there for you 100 percent", he said, adding, "this is a state that I know very well".

Fort Myers and Naples were among the cities hit hard by Irma, which made landfall in the state Sunday morning as a unsafe Category 4 storm.

Trump's praise, he said, is not just for rescue workers but "includes the people who live here". He toured a Houston shelter housing hundreds of displaced people and walking streets lined with soggy, discarded possessions.

Florida's southwestern coast is a haven for retirees seeking warm weather and attractive sunsets across the Gulf of Mexico. 'Not an expert, but are stiletto heels the best footwear for a disaster zone?' another quipped, as more than 5,000 people shared the post. Widespread outages led to long lines outside of the relatively few stores, gas stations and restaurants that had reopened. Days after Irma passed, nearly 80 percent of homes and businesses were still without electricity, and floodwaters still covered some communities entirely.

'I believe in the First Amendment and boobs'
Myanmar faces 'defining moment', must stop the violence