Prime Is Now Half-Price for Students

Amazon now lets teenagers shop via separate logins attached to their parents' accounts

Amazon now lets teens shop with their own account, but with parental approval

If you place a bit more trust in your kids (or if you simply don't want to constantly approve or deny purchases), you can scrap the approval system altogether and opt instead to set specific spending limits. Amazon also sees a convenient opportunity to hook a new generation of customers-those kids will have their own accounts already when they turn 18, and boom, time to pummel them with offers for all the stuff they need to buy for college and young adulthood. From there, the teenager is free to create their own username and password and then use that to log into the Amazon App.

One major benefit this program offers families is the ability to share Prime membership features. But if they do pay for Prime, teens will also get access to free shipping, streaming video and Prime's other perks. In this case, the parent will receive a notification with an itemized list of the order, and the option remains to cancel it or initiate a refund if it is too late to cancel.

The set up also aims to encourage teens to use their parents' Prime accounts, if they have them. Two adults and up to four teens and four child profiles may link in a Household.

The online retail giant said Wednesday that teens can now shop on Amazon on their own, if their parents let them. To get started, parents can visit amazon.com/forteens or sign up via a text or email invitation from their teens.

Amazon - which had annual revenue of $136 billion a year ago - accounts for roughly one-third of all online US sales.

The next step for Amazon would be to make it easier for teens to use this cash, perhaps by configuring a digital allowance parents can dole out to teens' accounts.

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