Facebook wants your nude selfies to combat 'revenge porn'

A Like logo at Facebook headquarters in Menlo Park Calif

A Like logo at Facebook headquarters in Menlo Park Calif

Earlier this year Facebook launched photo-matching technology to help stop revenge porn, but hashing takes its efforts to another level.

Facebook claims it won't store the images, but rather a "hash system" that would allow their algorithm to recognize similar pictures without holding them on their servers.

Facebook is asking its Australian users to send their nude pics in order to avoid revenge porn on social media.

If someone suspects they've been hacked or someone will post sensitive photos without their consent, the victim can preempt the "image-based assault" by filling out a form and uploading a photo to their self via Messenger.

The pilot provides a portal for people concerned that an intimate image may be shared online to report it to the Office of the eSafety Commissioner who will notify Facebook to prevent any instances of the image being uploaded after the notification has been actioned.

There are fears the images could be found before being deleted, intercepted on their way to Facebook, or people could get around the technology by simply resizing images.

Prof Clare McGlynn, from Durham Law School, said that the United Kingdom should establish a similar organisation to Australia's e-safety commission.

Turns out, before the image can be "hashed", an actual human at Facebook has to look at it to make sure it "fits the definition of revenge porn". Facebook, in their April announcement of the program, called the employees "specially trained representatives from our Community Operations team".

She said the plan, "has the potential to disable the control and power perpetrators hold over victims, particularly in cases of ex-partner retribution and sextortion, and the subsequent harm that could come to them".

The program is available in three other countries i.e, U.S., U.K., and Canada.

Users are encouraged to send intimate photos to Facebook, who will put a unique digital fingerprint on it before it is sent to the recipient.

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