Facebook Working On Method To Prevent Revenge Porn

Facebook is asking users to upload nudes to stop revenge porn online

Facebook suggests users upload nudes to avoid revenge porn

They will then tell you to send the nudes to yourself on Facebook, and will let Facebook know you've done this. The company is testing a program in Australia that would mark each picture as non-consensual explicit material.

At least that is what Facebook and the Australian government is saying to do in a new test aimed at cutting off potential revenge porn before it happens.

If you're anxious your intimate photos will end up on Instagram or Facebook, you can get in contact with Australi's e-Safety Commissioner. The social media platform wants its members to preemptively upload their nude and intimate pictures to Facebook for safe-keeping.

I guess you've got to be pretty anxious that some toe-rag is interested in sharing nude photographs of you, if you're prepared to ask for Facebook's help in this way.

Grant sought to allay concerns of users about what Facebook would do with the photos they upload.

"The likelihood of Facebook being compromised is slim of course, but if the user was tricked into sending them to a third party - that could open them up for further abuse", he told Infosecurity.

Facebook will then put a digital fingerprint on the image and will block the sensitive image from appearing if someone tries to upload that same image to Facebook or Instagram.

Australia is one of the four countries included in this "industry-first" pilot that relies on "cutting-edge" technology to prevent revenge porn.

There are laws against revenge porn, but the scourge is hard to fight against in practical terms.

In Australia, Facebook's customer support team has been reviewing blurred versions of the image in order to determine whether or not it is explicit.

"Revenge porn is a huge problem and Facebook could be held liable for it, so they are trying to do something". For protection against "revenge porn", the Telegraph reported.

"We see many scenarios where maybe photos or videos were taken consensually at one point, but there was not any sort of consent to send the images or videos more broadly".

"We can now prevent [revenge porn] from being shared on Facebook, Messenger and Instagram", Facebook said in a blogpost earlier this year announcing the technology.

"Once Facebook is notified, they use image-matching technology to access and tag the image to prevent anyone from sharing it on their platforms", USA Today explained.

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