Federal Judge Rejects Trump Request to Delay Enlistment of Trans Troops

Federal Judge Rejects Trump Request to Delay Enlistment of Trans Troops

Federal Judge Rejects Trump Request to Delay Enlistment of Trans Troops

A federal judge on Monday ruled that the government must allow transgender people to enlist in the military beginning on January 1, 2018.

District Court Judge Colleen Kollar-Kotelly denied the administration's request to postpone an Obama-era January 1 start date for transgender individuals to join the armed services.

The Trump trans military ban issued via Twitter in July 2017 was always based on flimsy reasoning: The U.S. President consulted no now serving military officials about it and lied about the military not being able to absorb the cost of trans healthcare (even though the military spends five times more money on Viagra).

In June of 2016, the Department of Defense told transgender members of the armed forces it was safe to come out and serve openly and authentically, and estimates show there are thousands of transgender individuals now serving in the military.

President Barack Obama's administration lifted the ban on transgender individuals serving openly in the military in June 2016.

Federal Judge Rejects Trump Request to Delay Enlistment of Trans Troops
Federal Judge Rejects Trump Request to Delay Enlistment of Trans Troops

Not so, Kollar-Kotelly said in the order issued today.

A federal court ruled Monday that the USA military must move forward with plans to allow transgender recruits by the beginning of 2018. The policy also banned the military from paying for gender-affirming surgery, with some exceptions to "protect the health" of someone who had already begun transitioning. Kollar-Kotelly did not think the Trump administration's arguments met that level of scrutiny, calling their rationale for the transgender ban "hypothetical and extremely overboard".

A police officer stands guard as dozens of protesters gather in Times Square near a military recruitment center to show their anger at President Donald Trump's decision to reinstate a ban on transgender individuals from serving in the military on July 26, 2017 in New York City.

"President Trump's tweets did not emerge from a policy review, nor did the Presidential Memorandum identify any policymaking process or evidence demonstrating that the revocation of transgender rights was necessary for any legitimate national interest", Garbis wrote in his directive last week. "We are pleased that Judge Kollar-Kotelly confirmed her prior ruling that on January 1, transgender people who can meet the same qualifications as others will be eligible to enlist".

Ehrsam added that "none of the plaintiffs have established that they will be impacted by current policies on military service".

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