Former Philadelphia Phillies pitcher Roy Halladay dead in plane crash

Pitcher Roy Halladay shown with the Philadelphia Phillies in 2010

Pitcher Roy Halladay shown with the Philadelphia Phillies in 2010

Authorities responded to a call for a small plane down shortly after noon. The spokesperson said they are now engaged in a recovery effort.

Halladay, 40, was piloting the plane.

"He was probably one of the most humble human beings you'll ever meet", Nocco said.

If baseball was Roy Halladay's first love, flying was second. He talked about his family. "He talked about baseball and he talked about flying".

Former US baseball star Roy "Doc" Halladay passed away Tuesday in a tragic small airplane wreck.

"We are numb over the very tragic news about Roy Halladay's untimely death", the Phillies said in a statement posted to Twitter. He played for both the Toronto Blue Jays and the Philadelphia Phillies. Tampa Bay's CBS affiliate reported that the plane was owned by Halladay.

Aside from aviation, Halladay helped coach several local youth baseball teams, including Calvary Christian High School's state champion team.

Halladay's father, Harry, was a corporate pilot, and Roy grew up in Colorado in the shadow of aircrafts.

It is still under investigation who owns the plane and if that person was aboard the aircraft.

The crash occurred early Tuesday afternoon.

The Icon A5 is a single-engine, high wing aircraft that seats two people.

The A5 can take off and land from the water or from the tarmac. The Federal Aviation Administration will investigate.

The pilot did not file a flight plan, according to flightaware.com, which tracks aircraft movement.

The sheriff's department in Pasco County, Fla., confirmed Halladay's body was found at the scene of the crash.

Halladay went 203-105 with a 3.38 ERA, in his 16-year career with the Toronto Blue Jays and Philadelphia Phillies. The righty was a two-time (2003, 2010) Cy Young victor.

Halladay threw a flawless game in 2010 against the Marlins. That season he went 21-10 with a 2.44 ERA and threw a ideal game in the regular season and a no-hitter in his first postseason start. Not to mention, Philadelphia had earned trips to the World Series in each of the previous two seasons, so there was plenty of excitement surrounding the move to land Halladay when looking at what he was able to accomplish in the 12 years with the Blue Jays.

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