Jumping partygoers cause floor to collapse at Denton student apartments, authorities say

Meanwhile in Denton #UNT' added one user along with a gif of the classic Disney film The Aristocats that depicts the cats partying so hard they too fall to the floor below

Video: Floor collapses during homecoming party

Local firefighters believe the floor collapsed because of too much jumping.

"A medical triage was set up, but only minor injuries were reported", Denton Fire Marshal Brad Lahart said in a statement released Sunday.

NBC reported that two tenants drove to the police station to report the party - which was so loud the apartment shook.

Glenn says at least 30 people were in the apartment when the floor gave way, although some witnesses and Twitter video of the incident show more people.

However, dozens of University of North Texas students have subsequently been displaced.

Students at the University of North Texas in Denton gathered at a third-floor apartment to celebrate homecoming Saturday night.

"I have nowhere to go". Instead, they were at the Denton Police Department making a noise complaint about the party. "That's life threatening. If we were in our living room, we wouldn't have made it out because by what we've seen, it's just completely gone".

Carroll and her three roommates, all North Texas sophomores, were not home at the time.

"People gotta grab their wallets, keys, back packs because we have school tomorrow", said Trent Blackburn.

"TV's, computers, just everything", Carroll told WFAA. "And it's one of those things that you fear would happen, but you don't think it's actually going to happen", said Carroll.

Denton Police told FOX 4 they have received previous noise complaints, but people have mostly left the party by the time officers arrive.

An investigation into the structural failing is now underway, while apartment management and the university have worked to help secure housing in dorms or hotels for affected students in the building.

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