Saudi blockade on Yemen must be lifted 'for humanitarian reasons immediately'

Yemenis stash supplies fearing worst after strongman's death

Yemenis stash supplies fearing worst after strongman's death

Under persistent bombing and a military blockade by the coalition, thousands of civilians in the capital of Sanaa and other Houthi-controlled areas have been killed by airstrikes, starvation and disease. The coalition has been striking Houthi positions, hoping that Saleh's loyalists might allow forces loyal to President Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi to return to the capital. Saudi Arabia and its allies have launched a campaign to oust Huthi rebels who control the capital Sanaa and who have links to Riyadh's arch foe Iran. He was killed by the rebels on Monday, leaving his followers in disarray.

Mohamed Ali al-Houthi, a rebel leader, said Tuesday that "some sons" of Saleh have been hospitalized, without providing further details.

Iran's semi-official ISNA news agency quoted Gen. Mohammad Ali Jafari on Tuesday as saying that Saudi Arabia, "on behalf of the US and the Zionist regime (Israel), has a very important role in creating insecurity" in the Middle East.

RSF's sources said the journalists were forced to surrender the TV channel's access codes, enabling the Houthis to broadcast their own content.

But that alliance unravelled over the last week, with heavy fighting across the capital, and Saleh was reportedly shot dead by Huthi fighters after he fled the city.

The killing of Yemen's ex-President Ali Abdullah Saleh by the country's Shiite rebels as their alliance crumbled has thrown the almost three-year civil war into unpredictable new chaos.

The Houthis and Saleh's forces began fighting each other in Sanaa last week.

It also shatters hopes by Yemen's Saudi-backed government that Saleh's recent split with the Iranian-backed rebels, known as Houthis, would have weakened them and given the government and the Saudi coalition backing a chance for a turning point in the stalemated war that has brought humanitarian disaster.

Saleh and the Houthis used to be allies in the struggle against the government headed by President Abd-Rabbu Hadi.

But over the past year, the Houthis appear to have undermined Saleh, wooing away some of his commanders. Witnesses said the bodies of slain civilians and fighters littered the streets as ambulances were unable to reach them. That seems to have pushed Saleh into flirting with the coalition, ultimately leading to the breakdown of the rebel alliance.

A least 234 people were killed in fighting that the International Committee of the Red Cross described as the fiercest since the start of the conflict. It is reported that only five people attended the funeral.

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