Yemen's Houthis: Saleh's overture to Saudi 'a coup'

Yemen's Houthis: Saleh's overture to Saudi 'a coup'

Yemen's Houthis: Saleh's overture to Saudi 'a coup'

Saleh on Saturday said he was ready to turn a "new page" in relations with the Saudi-led coalition, which had intervened to place his successor back in power.

Yemen's war has killed more than 10,000 people since 2015, displaced more than two million people, caused a cholera outbreak infecting almost one million people and led the country on the brink of starvation.

Former Yemen dictator Ali Abdullah Saleh has announced he is open to talks with the Saudi-led coalition fighting rebels, as his alliance with the Houthi insurgents appears to have crumbled.

"Disagreements (between the two sides) can be settled through negotiation, and invaders and enemies will get the most out of the sedition", he said, urging Saleh to abandon such "irresponsible" and "suspicious" moves.

The Huthis have also accused the former president of accepting funds from the Saudi-backed Hadi government.

The former Yemeni president's break with the Houthis came after five days of bitter clashes around the capital, Sana'a, between his supporters and those of the Iranian-backed Houthi militia.

The United Nations has warned that the country faces mass starvation unless the Saudi-led coalition allows more food aid to enter the impoverished country. "Saleh's speech is a coup against our alliance and partnership... and exposed the deception of those who claim to stand against aggression", a spokesman for the group said in a statement carried by the rebels' Al Masirah TV.

For his part, Houthi leader Abdel Malek al-Houthi called on Saleh to end what he called "the sectarian strife" that he has instigated, and threatened to take action against his supporters militarily if he does not.

Saleh may be a noticeable player in the Yemeni conflict, but one should not overestimate the role he plays, Sergey Balmasov, senior analyst at the Centre for Crisis Society Studies, told RT.

The Houthi rebels this month warned that they considered "airports, ports, border crossings and areas of any importance" in Saudi Arabia, as well as its ally the United Arab Emirates, legitimate targets. There is in fact no Yemen as a country: "It has been torn apart". "Riyadh is facing serious financial difficulties". Since then, countless airstrikes have struck rebel and civilian targets, causing thousands of casualties and crippling infrastructure in the Arab world's poorest country.

Yemen's civil war has killed more than ten thousand people since 2015, displaced more than two million people, caused a cholera outbreak infecting almost one million people and put the country on the brink of starvation.

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