Shadow of the Colossus Review

SHADOW OF THE COLOSSUS

Shadow of the Colossus Review

Almost thirteen years after its original release on PS2, Bluepoint Games has somehow found a way to make Shadow of the Colossus feel like an entirely new and fresh experience.

There's more reason to play Shadow of the Colossus than ever before. That's not the case with the new PS4 remake of Shadow of the Colossus. Having worked on the Uncharted: Nathan Drake Collection a couple of years back, the same company is now responsible for remaking Shadow of the Colossus for the PS4 and PS4 Pro.

The prominent gaming website bestowed an "essential" badge on the game, saying that developer Bluepoint makes the game "feel excitingly modern".

Tales speak of an ancient realm where Colossi roam the majestic landscape.

Released in late 2005 for the PS2, the original Shadow of the Colossus pits a mostly silent protagonist against over a dozen massive stone beasts to return life to a mysterious woman. Armed with only a sword and a bow, explore the spacious lands and unearth each Colossus, presenting a unique challenge to test your wits, determination, and skill. That's something you couldn't get in the original versions of the game. Unlike other games where bosses can get predictable, the colossi in the game are designed uniquely and players will really have to think ways on how to take them down such as using the environments to your advantage or think of what weapon suits best. The Playstation 4 version of the game definitely looks cleaner, and I personally enjoyed the boost in fidelity to 4K resolution.

SHADOW OF THE COLOSSUS
Shadow of the Colossus Review

"Controlling Agro is a chore, with the controls for controlling horseback riding never feeling comfortable or even reliably responsive". Bluepoint have provided four control schemes that should appeal to most players of most major action-adventure titles today. While Bluepoint did fantastic work improving every single aspect of Shadow of the Colossus in this remake, this seems to be the one area that will always feel stuck in the PS2 generation.

The game doesn't explain where you are, when you are, why you're there beyond the initial setup, and that ultimately doesn't matter.

There aren't a ton of other new additions to the package found in this edition of Shadow of the Colossus, but small add-ons like visual filters help pad out the content a bit. I also found one new easter egg that ties into another Japan Studio game that you might be familiar with.

Despite everything that has been updated and added to this remake of Shadow of the Colossus, I think what I came away most impressed by was just how well the game holds up. "It's still a mysterious thing to play, that feels as thought provoking and artful as it did all those years ago on PS2". But, have I seen this dev diary video, I would've known that SOTC was in good hands. At the cheaper price of admission ($54.99) that you'll be playing for this game, it's near impossible not to recommend it even if you've played it before. If you doubt me, see if you can deny that that's true after you grip the highly detailed, naturally flowing fur of the first Colossus you encounter in-game.

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