Apple Chief Tim Cook Blasts Facebook Over Data Privacy

Tim Cook at the March 27 Apple event in Chicago    
   Scott Olson  Getty

Tim Cook at the March 27 Apple event in Chicago Scott Olson Getty

Cook's remarks come just as Facebook's own chief executive, Mark Zuckerberg, is reportedly expected to testify before Congress around the Cambridge Analytica data-sharing scandal. "We've elected not to do that".

Speaking to Recode's Kara Swisher and MSNBC's Chris Hayes, Cook said he'd prefer that Facebook and others would have curbed their use of personal data to build "these detailed profiles of people. patched together from several sources".

Cook compared Facebook's business model to Apple's, focusing on the former's reliance on user data to make money.

At the annual China Development Forum in Beijing last week, Cook said there was a need for "well-crafted regulation" to prevent users' information being peddled around without their knowledge. He added: "However, I think we're beyond that here".

Facebook has been embroiled in a scandal since it became public earlier this month that the political data firm Cambridge Analytica, which has ties to Donald Trump's 2016 presidential campaign, stole data from 50 million users by abusing Facebook's tools. Regulation can have unexpected consequences, right?

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg doesn't necessarily seem opposed to that idea.

Cook has always been an outspoken advocate of privacy and encryption, refusing to aid the Federal Bureau of Investigation by creating a backdoor into an iPhone 5c which belonged to the gunman behind the San Bernardino shooting in December 2015, in which 14 people were killed on the basis it set a "dangerous prescedent".

Facebook is facing harsh criticism from privacy experts across the world for manhandling of user's private data. In the videos below, Cook gives his opinion about online privacy and talked about how Apple is careful with their app star saying, "we do carefully review each app and police now".

He was then asked what he'd do if he were Mark Zuckerberg.

Cook's comments, reported by Recode, were part of a taped interview for MSNBC's Revolution, which will air Friday, April 6.

"I wouldn't be in the situation", he responded.

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