Donald Trump to lift legal threat to states that permit marijuana use

A SEPT. 20 2017 FILE

Sen. Cory Gardner was encouraged by Trump's announcement

"Furthermore, President Trump has assured me that he will support a federalism-based legislative solution to fix this states' rights issue once and for all".

On the night of April 11, 2018, Trump and Gardner had a telephone conversation in which the president contradicted the Sessions memo, telling the senator from Colorado - where marijuana has been legalized for adult-use since 2014 - would not be subjected to a federal crackdown on cannabis.

Gardner's blockade held up the confirmations of about 20 nominees at the Justice Department.

Republican senator from Colorado on whether President Trump has the authority required to authorize a retaliatory strike on Assad regime, discusses Mike Pompeo's suitability to be secretary of state and potential agreement with the Trump administration to protect states' rights over the legalization of marijuana.

Cory Gardner said Trump promised him over the phone Wednesday that a memo Sessions issued a year ago won't affect his home state.

The president's decision will reflect a separation from U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions, that in January rescinded an Obama-era coverage, called as "the Cole memo", that gave countries greater leeway within the national administration on bud coverage.

President donaldtrump has reportedly lent his support to a USA senator from Colorado, asserting to endorse legislation which "safeguards states' rights" on legalized bud.

"This can not be another episode of @realDonaldTrump telling somebody whatever they want to hear, only to change directions later on", U.S. Sen.

Inside his Friday statement, Gardner mentioned he'd released until he gained & ldquo; the full devotion that the guidelines of this Cole Memo wouldbe honored, a few holds, but abandoned others in place.

Marijuana legalization advocates were ebullient. "As one of the largest licensed operators of cannabis in the state of California, we expect this change of direction to significantly clarify things in state-legal markets". In light of Trump's phone call, the senator said he has had a change of heart. During the presidential campaign, Trump said in an interview with KUSA-TV in Colorado that he said "it's up to the states" on the marijuana issue.

Gardner said he was blindsided when Sessions made his announcement in January regarding pot prosecutions.

A spokesperson for the White House added that Trump "does respect Colorado's right to decide for themselves how to best approach this issue". Gardner has met with Sessions and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, the official overseeing the Russian Federation probe who has been the target of Trump's ire.

Also, isn't it a little weird that Gardner kept insisting that "Colorado's legal marijuana industry" would be protected, not the industry in all legalized states?

Legislation to protect states where marijuana is legal is still being drafted.

Gardner's office is hopeful of getting enough bipartisan support for the bill to pass the GOP-controlled Congress - something the president's backing would aid.

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