Nipah virus alert in Bihar

Family members of the patients admitted at the Kozhikode Medical College wear safety masks as a precautionary measure after the 'Nipah' virus outbreak in Kozhikode

Nipah virus alert in Bihar

Eating food which may have the droplets of saliva of infected bats can lead to the transmission of the virus.

Health Minister Shailaja told the media in Thiruvananthapuram that though the virus had been contained, there was a need to be alert.

Experts believe both Nipah and Hendra are spread by flying foxes - bats of the genus Pteropus - with humans becoming infected by exposure to bat urine and saliva on fruit, or from infected pigs and horses. "Patients with fever and cold have been asked to be dealt with separately and N95 masks have been handed over to the staff to ensure that the disease is not spread", said the superintendent of Osmania Hospital as per a report by Deccan Chronicle.

The Nipah virus or NiV infection has symptoms like breathing trouble, brain swelling, fever, headache, drowsiness, disorientation and delirium.

Officials found "many dead bats" in a well in that home. So we have the responsibility to take care of her family. The blood samples of Muhammed Sabith, who died first in Changaroth were not sent for examination. "A few drivers did not want to carry the body to the crematorium even though we told them that they would not have to touch it", a relative reportedly said. Noted author and rationalist MN Karassery also joined in, tweeting to the Kerala Chief Minister, to institute an award for the most service-minded female nurse, in honour of Lini. Two "control rooms" in the worst-hit Kozhikode district have been set up to closely monitor the spread of the virus.

There is no vaccine to prevent the Nipah Virus.

Districts of Kannur, Kozhikode, Malappuram, and Wayanad are identified as unsafe. "However, if travellers wish to be extra cautious, they may avoid the four districts", Health Secretary Rajeev Sadanandan said.

The health situation in Kerala has been brought under control by the state government, by not allowing the virus infection from spreading to more locations.

There had been no travel advisories issued Wednesday morning by the Indian central government or the U.S. Embassy in New Delhi.

"The principal of the school and the students said that bats come here every year, and eventually perish, however, this year, their numbers are far greater than in previous years", Sharma said.

India said it has contained the highly contagious Nipah virus that has killed some 10 people in its southern state of Kerala. The virus also transmits from humans to humans.

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