The 'trend' that is troubling the US

How to look for suicide warning signs

The 'trend' that is troubling the US

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released figures Thursday on suicide rates across the U.S. According to the report, the suicide rate in Minnesota jumped 40.6 percent over 18 years. But most did have life problems.

The report comes as the deaths of fashion designer Kate Spade and chef, writer and TV personality Anthony Bourdain this week, both of apparent suicide, have thrust the issue into the national spotlight.

Health professionals didn't offer a reason for the increase but said suicides rarely result from a single factor.

Other studies have found much higher rates of mental health disorders among people at high risk of suicide, experts noted.

Rural states, she explained, are still recovering from economic downturns and residents tend to be more isolated, without access to proper care.

Genevieve Weber, Hofstra University associate professor of counseling and mental health, agreed that a direct approach is best. In Ohio, suicides were up 36 percent.

Montana experienced about 29 suicides for every 100,000 people - the highest in the nation - compared with about seven people out of every 100,000 in the District of Columbia - the lowest.

On Friday, I spoke with Lisa Jarvis about her mental health journey, how it's come full-circle and how we can do something to change the stigma and the circumstances surrounding suicide.

The CDC report shows a little more than half of the people who died by suicide between 1999 and 2016 didn't have a known mental health condition.

Despite the steadiness of the suicide rate in the state, Allen says there is a lot of work to do.

Julia Payson says it's important to let people know you're there for them.

For online chat, the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline provides a confidential chat window, with counselors available 24/7.

Earlier this year Gov. Ralph Northam signed a new law that requires the Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services to report its progress and activity on suicide prevention every year. Watford said. "So if they are dealing with that and I'm already kind of in that place, then things must really be hard". For those who don't understand depression, when someone is in that place it's not because they want to die.it's because the ongoing, relentless darkness is too painful to endure anymore.

"We don't think we can just leave this to the mental health system to manage". In 2016, Kentucky reported 756 suicides, West Virginia reported 362 and OH led the area with 1,707. Guns are still the most common means of suicide, accounting for about half of all suicide deaths in the US.

Prevention has been elusive, in part because doctors have not had programs that reliably reduce suicide rates.

Buhse said anyone anxious about a friend or loved one should check in on them and use a direct approach.

If you're anxious someone you know may be at risk of suicide, you should talk to them about it, says the Canadian Association of Suicide Prevention.

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