Dem senator: Kavanaugh would 'turn back the clock' on women's healthcare

US President Donald Trump congratulates his Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh

US President Donald Trump congratulates his Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh

West Virginia Democratic Senator Joe Manchin, battling for reelection in a state Trump won in 2016, in a statement on Kavanaugh's nomination, said the "Supreme Court will ultimately decide if almost 800,000 West Virginians with pre-existing conditions will lose their healthcare".

The focus is not just on influencing the confirmation votes in the Senate but on using the Supreme Court nomination battle to energize Trump supporters to turn out for Republican candidates in the fall elections.

The opinion of the Yale petitioners was far less favorable, calling Kavanaugh's nomination "an emergency" and the judge himself a "threat to the most vulnerable".

While one national political analyst said McCain, who has been in Arizona since late a year ago battling brain cancer, may be willing to give up his seat if it would help Kavanaugh be confirmed, another Arizona lawmaker has different thoughts.

President trump wants Kavanaugh confirmed by the time the court begins it's new term in October. Kavanaugh, a 53-year-old appeals judge, is revered in conservative circles for his perceived loyalty to the text of the Constitution.

During Senate hearings, Kavanaugh will undoubtedly be questioned about whether he would support overturning Roe v. Wade, the 1973 decision that established a woman's federal right to an abortion.

In addition, the New York Democrat said, the nominee's writings reveal an expansive view of presidential authority that is ominous in the Trump era.

Senator Lindsey Graham criticized Democrats for their opposition to President Donald Trump's Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh. It's a Supreme Court justice, this is a lifetime job.

If confirmed by the Senate, Kavanaugh would replace Justice Anthony Kennedy, who is retiring.

Republicans have a 51-49 majority in the Senate.

The president of Family Research Council argues that what may be the most persuasive thing about Kavanaugh is the confidence that conservatives have in the man who nominated him.

Collins, from ME, and Alaska's Murkowski are two genuine mavericks in the Republican Party, and all eyes have turned to them.

"I don't think that's going to happen", she said. Manchin has. But Donnelly echoed Manchin when he said, "I work for the people of IN and I want them to have a voice IN this".

Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer on Tuesday rattled off topics Kavanaugh might have to rule on as a Supreme Court justice.

"I am here tonight because I'm a United States senator", Sen.

"I really consider Kavanaugh a friend of all the bill of rights provisions, I've studied other opinions of his, so yes, he would be a friend of the Second Amendment", said Stephen Halbrook, a lawyer and Senior Fellow at the Independent Institute.