Trump orders United States flags at half-staff for Maryland shooting victims

US man Jarrod Warren Ramos poses for

AP US man Jarrod Warren Ramos poses for

President Donald Trump denied the request to lower flags to honor the victims of the Capital Gazette newsroom shooting in Maryland.

Five journalists were gunned down in a mass shooting at the Capital Gazette newspaper last Thursday.

Jarrod Warren Ramos, 38, is accused of walking into the office of the newspaper on Thursday and shooting dead five employees with a shotgun.

Killed in the rampage were Gerald Fischman, Rob Hiaasen, John McNamara, Rebecca Smith and Wendi Winters. Annapolis Mayor Gavin Buckley wondered aloud after he says the White House said no to his request that the slain newspaper staff be so honored.

'This attack shocked the conscience of our nation and filled our hearts with grief, ' he said.

Trump repeatedly has called journalists the "enemy of the people".

Buckley called the initial decision to not lower the flags "an attack on the press" and "an attack on freedom of speech".

Phil Davis, a Capital Gazette crime reporter, recounted how he was hiding under his desk along with other newspaper employees when the shooter stopped firing, the Capital Gazette reported on its website. "I told you so", reads the June 28 document sent to the Capital Gazette's former lawyer, with instructions to share it with the paper's former publisher, reports the Baltimore Sun.

She told Hartley that she believed she was laid off from her job at a bank because of Ramos' contacts with her employers, and she first contacted police about Ramos in September 2010.

"[Trump] is well aware his rhetoric against the media, calling them fake news, the enemy of the people and more creates a unsafe situation", Amy Siskind said on Twitter.

"I used to come home from work and I used to drive by my house every day and pause and make sure nothing looked amiss, make sure my windows looked cracked, my door wasn't ajar", she said.

Hundreds of people gathered on Friday evening to remember the five people gunned down at a community newspaper office in Annapolis, Maryland, one of the deadliest attacks on journalists in United States history.

Ramos sued the newspaper for defamation after a column appeared about his online stalking.

"Yesterday was an incredibly tragic day for our colleagues in Annapolis - a tragedy felt deeply by all of us at our papers across the country", Dearborn wrote in a letter to the company.

"He reached out to me via email to ask if I remembered him from high school and I replied to him nicely that I did not", Lori told NBC.

Iran vows to foil US bid to block oil exports
Russia Parties as Spain Win Keeps World Cup Dream Alive