CEO Dorsey explains why Twitter not joining ban of Alex Jones

Tech companies gave massive platforms to conspiracy theorists like Alex Jones. Is the crackdown finally here

CEO Dorsey explains why Twitter not joining ban of Alex Jones

"Folks, there was some bad news recently for extreme right-wing conspiracy theorist and bath salts spokesmodel Alex Jones", the Late Show host said.

Dorsey admitted that Twitter has done a bad job of explaining their reasoning in the past but said the company was working on effectively improving communication with the general public.

As BuzzFeed's Charlie Warzel pointed out, Jones does use Twitter differently from the way he uses other social-media sites, posting less inflammatory content.

He stated that Jones "hasn't violated our rules" yet, but Dorsey says that rules will be enforced, and the platform is committed to maintaining "a healthy conversational environment" while (hopefully) watching out for bot-driven amplification of tweets. "Moving forward, we all need more clarity on what their rules are and how they intend to enforce them".

A number of platforms have reached a different conclusion, as the crackdown on Jones intensified this week.

As of this writing, InfoWars is now the fourth most popular free app on the Apple App Store, beating CNN, the New York Times, Google News, HuffPost, and dozens of other mainstream news outlets.

Murphy, who has represented CT in the US Senate since 2013, was among the vocal supporters of the controversial decision by several tech companies to suspend Jones from their platforms.

In a similar move, Spotify also removed all the episodes of Jones' The Alex Jones Show after removing selected episodes last week.

Twitter founder Jack Dorsey speaks at an event in London on November 20, 2014. Information posted by InfoWars is often not published on Twitter and replies to InfoWar tweets typically include people challenging the assertions, the spokesperson also noted.

Several users on Twitter pointed out the seeming inconsistency of Twitter's policies.

Kevin M. Kruse, a historian at Princeton, sought to portray Dorsey's resort to Twitter's codes of conduct as blind to Jones's online behavior.

He is now being sued by the parents of the children murdered in the 2012 Sandy Hook school shooting, having claimed the attack was a hoax.

Curiously, Alex Jones hasn't yet commented on the decision via Twitter, another platform where his presence has been somewhat controversial.

Jones, who has 858,000 followers on Twitter, has built up his profile while promulgating conspiracy theories.

Dorsey said he wanted Twitter to avoid succumbing to outside pressure but instead impartially enforce straightforward principles "regardless of political viewpoints".

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