Mexico Slowly Processes Caravan Migrants at Guatemala Border

Here’s what happened to the size of the Honduran migrant caravan after Trump’s threat

The migrant caravan from Honduras has swelled in size despite President Donald Trump threatening to cut aid to the country

"I am watching the Democrat Party led (because they want Open Borders and existing weak laws) assault on our country by Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador, whose leaders are doing little to stop this large flow of people, INCLUDING MANY CRIMINALS, from entering Mexico to U.S.", Trump tweeted Thursday morning. On Saturday, officials there began accepting small groups for asylum processing and granting some 45-day visitor permits, according to the Associated Press.

Defying the efforts of four governments to break them up, thousands of mostly Honduran migrants rose at dawn on Sunday from the shores of a river between Guatemala and Mexico and continued their trek northward.

Jose Porfirio Orellana, a 47-year-old acorn and bean farmer from Yoro province in Honduras, said he hopes to reach the United States due to woeful economic conditions in his country. After Mexican authorities slowed access through the border bridge to a crawl, hundreds of migrants are boarding the rafts or wading across the river and crossing into Mexico illegally.

"In Mexico, we have the rule of law, and we shall apply-enforce the law, but there will also be a humanitarian way that we will think about the migrant in the first place", said Mexican Foreign Secretary Luis Videgaray, minister of foreign affairs, to reporters in Mexico City.

"On Thursdays I paid the 18th Street gang, and on Saturdays the MS-13", Aguilar said.

Department of Homeland Security Secretary Kristjen Nielsen tweeted that DHS would continue "to support our Mexican partners as they take steps to confront the crisis on their southern border".

A caravan of Central Americans that formed in southern Mexico in late March also drew the ire of Mr. Trump, who on Thursday threatened to deploy the military and close the southern USA border if Mexico did not halt the latest procession.

Mr Hernandez said another 486 migrants were in transit back to Honduras, a roughly 12-hour trip by road. Those attempting to skip the process would face deportation, but the size of the caravan will test Mexico, which has sought help from the U.N.to manage the issue.

They included 52 children, nine of them 5 years old or younger.

US President Donald Trump, speaking at a rally in Elko, Nevada, kept up his rhetoric against the migrants and suggested the caravan was politically motivated.

"We're running away from violence, and we arrive here and they just hit us more", Marta Ornelas Cazares, 28, said.

At least a half-dozen migrants fainted amid the heat, and a steady stream abandoned the bridge to cross the Suchiate River by swimming, fording its shallows with the aid of ropes or floating in groups of about 10 on rickety rafts.

"One can not live back there", Vasquez said, standing next to the main border gate.

"A lot of people say 'I wonder who started that caravan?'" he said.

The Mexican government also released handout video of migrants on a bus being told by an official that they would be assisted in being processed for any asylum claims they may have.

"So as of this moment, I thank Mexico.

And you know why, because now Mexico respects the leadership of the United States". I call on the USA and Mexico to help us, because I am not a woman who needs handouts.

"We couldn't wait because we had already waited too long and they only told us lies", said Duarte, who joined the caravan with his wife and children six days ago.

"They're not coming into this country", Trump added.

About 4,000 illegal aliens, most from Honduras, tried to cross a bridge linking Mexico and Guatemala yesterday when the police tried to stop them.

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