New Space Station Crew Launches Thursday

Video footage from the launch at the Baikonur Cosmodrome shows a large plume of smoke coming from the rocket at the moment it failed and footage from inside the capsule shows the two astronauts being violently shaken about.

Two astronauts are alive after dramatically aborting their voyage to the International Space Station when their Russian Soyuz rocket malfunctioned.

The Soyuz MS-10 spacecraft carrying the crew of astronaut Nick Hague of the USA and cosmonaut Alexey Ovchinin of Russian Federation blasts off to the International Space Station (ISS) from the launchpad at the Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan October 11, 2018.

"Teams have confirmed the spacecraft separated from the booster and are in contact with the crew as the capsule returns in a ballistic decent mode", NASA reported. Search and rescue crews are heading to the landing site.

The space agency tweeted: "There's been an issue with the booster from today's launch".

A Soyuz failure could jeopardize continued operation of the International Space Station. The launch appeared to be normal until around first stage separation, when the crew reported a "failure" with the booster and feeling weightlessness.

They were to dock at the International Space Station six hours later, but the booster suffered engine failure minutes after the launch.

Russian news agencies, citing sources, report that both Soyuz crew members are alive and uninjured after an emergency landing in Kazakhstan following the on-schedule launch from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Hague and Ovchinin will spend about six months living and working aboard the orbiting lab.

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