Pittsburgh residents mourning after mass shooting, sound off on gun control

People console each other outside the synagogue in Pittsburgh where 11 people were shot dead

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A crowdfunding campaign by two Muslim American groups on Sunday had raised nearly $80,000 for the surviving victims of the Pittsburgh synagogue shooting a day before and the relatives of the 11 people who were killed.

The 11 victims have been identified and named by the city's chief medical officer, and their families have been informed.

Brothers Cecil and David Rosenthal usually attended services. The eldest was 97-year-old Rose Mallinger.

Fellow members of the New Light Congregation say Wax was a pillar of the congregation, filling many roles there.

Bowers was taken to a hospital where he was listed in fair condition with multiple gunshot wounds.

Robert Bowers, 46, of suburban Baldwin, surrendered to authorities after Saturday morning's shooting at the Tree of Life synagogue.

US Homeland Security (DHS) Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen told Fox News Sunday that DHS officials had made a site visit to the Pittsburgh synagogue in March to provide training on active shooter responses.

Eleven people, whose ages ranged from 54 to 97, were killed in the attack, including a couple and two brothers. Eleven people were shot dead - eight men and three women.

The U.S. attorney's office has charged Bowers with 29 federal counts.

Bowers, who was arrested at the scene of the attack, will make an initial appearance before a judge on Monday afternoon. State authorities have also leveled charges.

Israel also paid tribute to the victims of Saturday's massacre at a Pittsburgh synagogue with messages of solidarity.

Chancellor Angela Merkel's spokesman quoted Merkel on Twitter as offering her condolences and saying that "all of us must confront anti-Semitism with determination - everywhere".

US President Donald Trump hit out Saturday at what he called "hate" in America after the attack. "We should use this to advocate for what we believe in and being a welcoming safe country for those who need it". Our hearts are with the community of the Tree of Life Synagogue, the first responders who bravely rushed into danger to save lives, the people of Pittsburgh, and all those impacted by this tragic act of hate violence.

"We know that hatred will never win out, that those that try to divide us because of the way that we pray or where our families are from around the world will lose", the mayor said Sunday. He added that in the city of Mr. Rogers, "for every one person you see doing something hateful, there are hundreds who are trying to help".

Francis has frequently spoken out against religiously inspired violence and has denounced the easy availability of guns thanks to weapons manufacturers, whom he has called "merchants of death".

Robert Bowers was taken into custody after a shootout with a SWAT team. He was charged with 11 counts of criminal homicide, six counts of aggravated assault and 13 counts of ethnic intimidation.

A gunman who expressed hatred of Jews exploited a vulnerability common in so many houses of worship across the country - doors that are unlocked for worship - to target a Pittsburgh synagogue.

The mass shooting, called the deadliest attack on Jews in USA history, hit particularly close to home for Aaron, who said she used to live just a block away from Tree of Life, which is nestled in the Squirrel Hill neighborhood near several universities.

Four police officers are among the wounded.

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