US Seeks Answers About Missing Journalist From Saudi Ally

Oil prices rise as Iranian crude exports fall

Turkish newspaper names 15 Saudis in case of missing reporter

The Trump administration is left with an awkward lack of information about a widely respected writer who had been living in self-imposed exile in the US for the past year after fleeing a crackdown on intellectuals and activists in Saudi Arabia.

A contributor to The Washington Post, Khashoggi has not been seen since Tuesday last week, when he entered the Saudi consulate in Istanbul, Turkey, to collect papers for his upcoming wedding.

The Saudi government, including Prince Mohammad, has denied that allegation, insisting that Khashoggi freely left the Consulate shortly after his arrival.

Turkey's private NTV news channel identified one member of the alleged 15-member team as the head of a Saudi forensic science agency.

It wasn't clear whether the Saudis wanted to interrogate or kill him, or whether the U.S. warned the journalist he was a target, the person said.

A Turkish security source had previously told Reuters that the 15 Saudis, including some officials, left the country later the same day.

Khashoggi had sought to become a U.S. citizen after living in self-imposed exile since previous year, fearing repercussions for his criticism of the prince, Cengiz wrote.

Writing in the American Conservative on October 9, right-wing journalist Daniel Larison was equally critical-saying, "The messages coming from the Trump Administration are scarcely better than boilerplate statements, and it shows that the administration has no interest in criticizing the Saudi government or in holding them accountable for their crime".

U.S. Vice President Mike Pence said on Wednesday the United States was ready to help in any way in the investigation.

"It's a very sad situation, it's a very bad situation and we want to get to the bottom of it", Trump said.

Turkish investigators are looking into two Saudi Gulfstream jets that landed at the airport on 2 October.

The Sabah newspaper, which is close to Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, published images of what it referred to as the "assassination squad", apparently taken at passport control at the airport.

The Post report, citing an unnamed "person familiar with the information", said the intercepted communications showed that as yet unidentified Saudi officials wanted to lure Mr. Khashoggi back to Saudi Arabia and lay hands on him there.

It did not say how it obtained the pictures and data.

The video then cuts away to traffic outside the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul's upscale 4th Levent neighborhood, showing vehicles with green diplomatic license plates.

The Spectator reported claims that Mr Khashoggi had been offered a role as an adviser if he returned to Saudi Arabia but had declined because of "moral and religious" principles.

Cengiz, who told CNN that she does not feel comfortable enough to give an on-camera interview, said in written answers to questions from CNN's Christiane Amanpour that Khashoggi "may have been kidnapped, abducted, or some harm may have come to him".

The security sources told TRT World that the "hit squad" took CCTV footage from the Saudi consulate in Istanbul with them when they left Turkey.

About two and a half hours later, several men are seen leaving a hotel with their carry-on bags. The footage does not show Khashoggi himself leaving the consulate. "To me.it feels very much some nefarious activity has occurred by them".

During an October 9 interview with CNN's Don Lemon, Boot was extremely critical of Trump's anemic response to Khashoggi's disappearance-declaring, "This administration can not sweep this under the rug".

Khashoggi's fiancé Khadija Cengiz has broken her silence over the disappearance of the Saudi critic. We are going to take a serious look at it.

Why Hurricane Michael is monster unlike any other
Five children in Washington state stricken with limb paralysis; health officials investigating