Half of the world’s diabetics won’t have insulin by 2030, study says

98 million Indians will suffer from diabetes by 2030 says Study

Latest tech & science 98 million Indians will suffer from diabetes by 2030 says Study

Projection Stanford University researchers developed a microsimulation of type 2 diabetes management from 2018-2030 across 221 countries using data from the International Diabetes Federation.

"These estimates suggest that current levels of insulin access are highly inadequate compared to projected need, particularly in Africa and Asia, and more efforts should be devoted to overcoming this looming health challenge", Basu said in a statement.

Insulin is used to treat those with Type 1 diabetes and some people with Type 2 diabetes, which is linked to obesity and little physical activity. The study is a warning for the treatment of people suffering from type-2 diabetes in the coming years. At present more than 400 million people are affected by diabetes globally and there is an environment prevailing that it would increase in the upcoming years.

According to World Health Organization (WHO), India had 69.2 million people living with diabetes in 2015.

However, as per the study, around 33 million people with type 2 diabetes do not have access to insulin, and by 2030, the number will touch 41 million.

98 million Indians will suffer from diabetes by 2030 says Study
India had 69.2 million people living with diabetes in 2015 says a report of the World Health Organization

The Guardian quoted Dr. Sanjay Basu from Stanford University in the United States, who led the research, as saying the current levels of insulin access are inadequate especially in Africa and Asia, requiring more efforts to overcome this shortage.

Right now, three major manufacturers dominate the insulin market, and the treatment is expensive. According to a American Diabetes Association, prices of insulin have nearly tripled between 2002 and 2013.

While governments continue to encourage healthier lifestyles to prevent type 2 diabetes, the authors of the study also hope for initiatives to make life-changing insulin available and affordable.

Insulin, however, remains costly and prices can be especially out of reach in poorer countries, where tortuous supply chains and high markups by middlemen often make it unaffordable for many patients. The amount of people using insulin was part of this projection.

The shortfall is most acute in Africa, where the research team, led by Dr. Sanjay Basu from Stanford University, estimated that supply would have to rise sevenfold to treat at-risk patients who had reached the stage of requiring insulin to control their blood sugar.

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