McConnell to call Senate vote on Democrats' Green New Deal

Sen. Sherrod Brown D-Ohio speaks at a rally in Brunswick Ohio Jan. 30

Sen. Sherrod Brown D-Ohio speaks at a rally in Brunswick Ohio Jan. 30

After McConnell told reporters on Tuesday that he plans to hold a floor vote the Green New Deal plan unveiled last week by Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.) and Sen.

It's not the first time McConnell tried to push Democrats to take a divisive vote.

"When I say that R's have no plan for climate change, I know it's twitter and people are prone to exaggeration, so I want to be super clear: Republicans actually have no plan to address this threat to the planet".

"In a few short months the Green New Deal has become the vision for our future that most Americans want, and that terrifies the GOP", Ocasio-Cortez spokesman Corbin Trent said in a statement.

Others are (tepidly) admiring the Republican leader's strategy.

By sanctioning a vote, McConnell appears to be betting that the resolution will prove too radical for a good number of Democrats, let alone any Republicans. When asked about the Green New Deal on Tuesday, Senator Sherrod Brown of OH, who is reportedly considering a presidential run, said that he supports a Green New Deal but is "not going to take a position on every bill that's coming out".

McConnell announced during a news conference Tuesday that the vote would "give everybody an opportunity to go on record and see how they feel about the Green New Deal". Many are also saying the deal would severely hurt the economy.

The resolution has amassed significant but by no means widespread support on Capitol Hill - there are 67 co-sponsors in the House and 11 in the Senate, including several current or potential presidential contenders: Bernie Sanders, Kirsten Gillibrand, Elizabeth Warren, Cory Booker and Amy Klobuchar.

Even without McConnell's efforts, the Green New Deal has become the latest flashpoint in the Democratic party's internal conflict between its centrists and its unapologetic left wing.

Whatever happens next, it's becoming increasingly clear that the Green New Deal is turning into something the two parties think they can use to their advantage.

The deal is gaining popularity in the House, where more than 15 percent of representatives have signed on as sponsors.

In December, a poll from Yale and George Mason universities found that 81 percent of registered voters supported the goals of a Green New Deal, including 64 percent of Republicans and 57 percent of conservative Republicans. "I don't think the proposal is very realistic, but we'll wait and see if it comes up for a vote".

In response to McConnell's announcement, the youth-led Sunrise Movement scheduled an "emergency mass call" for Wednesday night to discuss plans to make the Senate Majority Leader regret his politically-motivated scheme. "So, look, the political stunts are not going to get us anywhere".

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