GM tells workers it's time for the strike to end

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The letter, written by Gerald Johnson, GM's executive vice president of manufacturing, said the automaker's proposal would: offer wage increases, profit sharing boosts, leave health-care benefits intact with no cost hike, provide a pathway to permanency for temporary employees and GM would make widescale investments in USA manufacturing.

GM also boosted the amount it plans to invest in its US plants to $8.3 billion, up from its previous offer of $7 billion, a source familiar with the company's offer said.

Of the new total, $7.7 billion would be invested directly in GM plants, including building an electric truck at the Detroit-Hamtramck Assembly Plant, with the remaining $1.3 billion to be used for joint ventures, including a potential battery plant near the idled Lordstown, Ohio plant.

"We have advised the Union that it's critical that we get back to producing quality vehicles for our customers", GM's letter says.

Credit Suisse said the strike will hurt suppliers, including American Axle AXL.N , Aptiv Plc APTV.N , Lear Corp LEA.N , Delphi Technologies DLPH.N , and Dana Inc DAN.N , whose exposure to GM varies between 5% and 18%, with American Axle at 40%.

For temporary workers, GM said its offer would create a path to permanent employment and include a ratification bonus.

Marick Masters, a professor at Wayne State University who specializes in labor negotiations, said GM's latest move and the UAW's forceful response suggest the strike is likely to go on at least "somewhat longer" even though the negotiations had made some progress in narrowing the differences between the two sides.

U.S. president Donald Trump and many lawmakers have also waded in, urging GM to build more vehicles in the United States and shift work from Mexico. Through this coming weekend, GM losses are expected to reach $1.13 billion, according to an estimate from Anderson Economic Group, while lost wages for GM employees are expected to have reached roughly $600 million.

Committees are working on issues such as products for factories that GM wants to close, investments in other US factories, and training for union workers to handle future technology, according to Dittes' letter.

The UAW reiterated its stance that union members sacrificed to help GM when the company fell on hard times financially during the 2009 recession and filed for bankruptcy.

Committees are working on issues such as products for factories that GM wants to close, investments in other US factories, and training for union workers to handle future technology, according to Dittes' letter.

"Yesterday, you indicated the union would refuse to meet or give any response to the company's comprehensive offer unless each of the five areas referenced in your letter were resolved on a single-issue basis". They have urged GM to build more vehicles in the United States and shift work from Mexico.

"Dittes wrote: "The completion of those committees is not known at this point, but they have been meeting since our 3:30 p.m. meeting" on Wednesday".

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