Was pregnant Elizabeth Warren really fired by NJ school district?

Unearthed docs contradict Warren's claims that she got fired for being pregnant — but she doubles down anyway

Elizabeth Warren Adamant She Was Fired at 22 For Being Pregnant

Throughout her time in public life, including as she recounted it as far back as 2007, Warren has repeatedly claimed she was sacked from her position as a public school teacher in 1971 directly as a result of her becoming pregnant. As two former schoolteachers in the Riverdale district told CBS News, there was a rule at the time that women would stop working. But, the Free Beacon, citing county records, reports Warren submitted her resignation after just one year and the board "accepted with regret".

Warren described the break from her teaching job in a 2007 interview as a choice between continuing her career and having children. I did that for a year, and then that summer I didn't have the education courses, so I was on an 'emergency certificate, ' it was called. Apparently no one had done a deep dive into the story to find out if, in fact, Warren was let go in 1971 as a result of her pregnancy, as she has repeatedly claimed. Since she began her campaign for the presidency, she has repeatedly said that she was "shown the door" after just a year as a result of her pregnancy.

"I will not be forced to make changes in how I raise money", Warren said. "I was then single, and ten years later still have no kids".

Hayes said "you've done calls to wealthy donors, you've done big ticket fundraisers, you've put together a pretty good war chest, I think about $11 million that you had amassed", and asked "What does that say about what you were doing before?" The Center for American Progress reported a year ago that pregnancy discrimination remained a problem in all industries. I went back to graduate school and took a couple of courses in education and said, "I don't think this is going to work out for me".

The Warren campaign didn't respond to a request for comment from The Epoch Times. She has relied on a small-dollar donation strategy that she says gives her more time to attend large rallies and stay long afterward taking selfies with supporters, rather than soon heading off to exclusive fundraisers or spending hours on the phone asking for money.

Warren claims, "By the end of the first year, I was visibly pregnant, and the principal did what principals did in those days - wish me luck and hire someone else for the job". "By June I was visibly pregnant - and the principal told me the job I'd already been promised for the next year would go to someone else", Warren tweeted on Tuesday, repeating the story she often tells on the presidential campaign trail about her experience as a speech pathologist at Riverdale Elementary School in New Jersey.

"This was 1971, years before Congress outlawed pregnancy discrimination - but we know it still happens in subtle and not-so-subtle ways", she said.

Warren has used almost identical retellings of the story dozens of times, including at rallies in Nevada and California last week, and wrote similarly of the experience in her 2014 memoir. Warren understands that she will need a committed and energized base of support.

"All I know is I was 22 years old, I was 6 months pregnant, and the job that I had been promised for the next year was going to someone else". The story about losing her teaching job falls into a sequence of events that Warren says helped to push her toward law school and eventually the Senate.

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